Simon Hegele pushes digitalization offensive

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published on 03/02/2021

Simon Hegele now uses the new, hybrid e-invoice standard "ZUGFeRD" ("Central User Guide of the Forum Electronic Invoice Germany"). The format, which was developed in Germany between authorities, associations and companies, enables the fully automated processing of invoices on an electronic basis.

With "ZUGFeRD"-compliant invoices, Simon Hegele now enables fast, convenient and simple electronic exchange of incoming and outgoing invoices for all customers and suppliers. Unlike paper and PDF invoices, e-invoices are issued, transmitted and received in a structured, electronic format. This enables smooth automated and electronic processing. While standards such as X-Invoice are already intended for machine processing but are not readable by humans, the hybrid data model "ZUGFeRD" includes a readable PDF in addition to XML data.

“This is just another milestone in the implementation of our Simon Hegele digitalization plans" says CEO, Stefan Ulrich. “An important success factor in our daily work for our customers, in addition to the quality-of-service provision, in particular is the speed of our processes which are strongly influenced by technological and digital changes. We see the use of 'ZUGFeRD' here as another opportunity to support our customers in their digitalization projects and thus generate further added value."

“The fact that we can also improve our CO² footprint and save enormous costs with ZUGFeRD makes the switch to e-invoices a promising overall concept for us," adds Michael Wahl, Commercial Manager.  “Of course, other starting points, such as optimized purchase-to-pay and order-to-cash processes as well as faster monthly closings, reporting and forecasts are also relevant, which we will create in real time in the long term and thus significantly increase our efficiency in the commercial backbone of our group of companies."

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